Chasiotis Received ASME Young Investigator Award

2012-01-04

AE Associate Prof. Ioannis Chasiotis was awarded the J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award at the 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition (IMECE) in Denver, Colorado, which is the annual meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

At right, Ares Rosakis, Chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division and Dean of Engineering of the California Institute of Techology, presents AE Prof. Ioannis Chasiotis with the J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award.
At right, Ares Rosakis, Chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division and Dean of Engineering of the California Institute of Techology, presents AE Prof. Ioannis Chasiotis with the J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award.
 The award recognizes special achievements of young applied mechanics investigators who have not reached their 40th birthday. Presented the award in November, Chasiotis was recognized for “outstanding contributions to the understanding of the mechanics of fracture of polycrystalline and nanocrystalline thin films, and the time dependent mechanics of nanoscale polymeric fibers with pioneering full-field experimental methods based on Atomic Force Microscopy and MEMS.”

Chasiotis, who concentrates on experimental mechanics at the nanoscale, has been widely recognized for his work over the last several years. Among his recent honors have been:

  • The 2012 M. Hetényi Award of the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM) for the Best Research Paper published in 2010 in SEM’s journal, Experimental Mechanics.
  • The 2010 Society of Engineering Science Young Investigator Medal, which is awarded to a young researcher in his or her ascendancy whose work has already had an impact in his/her field within Engineering Science.
  •  A 2008 National Science Foundation (NSF) Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), as one of only 100 young researchers honored in a ceremony at the White House.

A Donald Biggar Willett Scholar in the College of Engineering, Chasiotis has received other honors including the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, College of Engineering Xerox Awards for Faculty Research, two First Prizes in the Sandia MEMS Design Competition, and in 2011 he was selected as one of 85 of the nation’s brightest young engineers who took part in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) 17th Annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium.

His research interests focus on MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), nanostructured composite materials, mechanical behavior of polymeric and carbon nanofibers, and the application of atomic force microscopy in experimental mechanics.

Chasiotis started his career in Aerospace Engineering at Illinois in 2005, after working as an Assistant Professor in the University of Virginia’s Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department from 2001 to 2004.

He earned a degree in Chemical Engineering in 1996 from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, and a Master’s and a Ph.D. in Aeronautics in 1998 and 2002, respectively, from the California Institute of Technology.